Family Practice Examination: How A Good Board Review Helps

Are you panicking about the family practice examination? Wondering how to plod through mounds of information and case studies? With some basic preparation, you can easily sail through the family practice examination.

The first thing to do is to brush up on your basics. It seems like a trifle, but a good theoretical grounding in the basics of family practice means you are already one step closer to cracking the examination. Learn all the important points and take into reckoning all the probable questions that can come in the examination. Make lists of answers, and keep your question and answer list ready for easy reference while you study. The information is too vast and varied for you to know it all, so it makes sense to remember the crucial points. Try using mnemonics and other memory aids to help you memorize information.

Supplementing what you are learning with visuals is useful. Diagrams and illustrations help to visually support what you have learnt only through text. After all, medicine is all about practical application so the more you know about the human body, it prepares you better for the family practice board review examination.

It is a good idea to take a mock-test before the actual examination to check if you have assimilated all that you studied. And, if your mock-test does not go too well, you always know that you have time to prepare. You also get a fair idea of which topics you need to revise more. Taking a test in the simulated environment of an actual examination can go a long way in helping calm your jitters on the d-day.

Several institutes offer family practice board review courses. Check them out to see if they contain all that you need to pass the examination with confidence. A good family practice board review course not only presents all the information you would need in a structured manner, it also offers dynamic lectures, audio CDs and visual aids to help you prepare easily. While self-study is always useful, systematic study under good instructors can help clarify any doubt about a topic. Plus, the courses have case-studies to help you understand how the theories that you read of have been applied in practice.

The Ostler’s Institute in Indiana offers an array of family practice board review courses designed to help you face the examination with confidence. Their courses feature interactive lectures, visual aids such as picture quizzes, and auditory aids in the form of MP3s.

Nursing Careers – Becoming a Family Nursing Practitioner

If you find fulfillment in building long-term relationships with patients to the point that you personally know their kids or their other relatives by name and you exchange urbane scrubs free shipping gifts on holidays and maybe invite each other during birthdays and other special occasions, then being a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) may just be the right specialization for you. FNPs or simply, family nurses, enjoy a rich and varied work environment, opportunities for personal growth, and not to mention, very competitive salaries. Also, the demand for family nurse practitioners is expected to increase quite significantly for the next ten years.

Requirements for becoming a family nurse

To become a family nurse practitioner, you need to take up further studies on top of being a registered nurse, typically a Master’s in Science degree, which takes about one to two years; after which you will have to pass a state board of national certification exam. Agencies that offer certification include the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

The role of the family nurse

The family nurse specializes in family medicine and provides a wide range of patient care to different groups of patients, focusing on disease prevention and health promotion beginning in childhood and continues all throughout adulthood, being a witness to an individual’s aging process. The family nurse performs many duties that are commonly performed only by physicians and cares for a patient through the cycle of family life. The family nurse also provides specialty care such as perinatal and gynecological care, as well as a broad range of care services and is trained to diagnose and build treatment plans for chronic and acute diseases. He or she may prescribe interventions through physical exams, interviews, and diagnostic and lab testing, as well as prescribe medications and treatments to patients. Counseling and providing education are also part of the job.

Typical career path for FNPs

Before they became family nurse practitioners, a lot of FNPs practiced as RNs (registered nurses) as nursing staff in hospitals or other medical facilities. They usually go back to school after some years of experience and earn their master’s degree to become an Advanced Practice Nurse (APN). APN have advanced training and commonly deliver some medical services that are reserved only for physicians.

Work settings

One of the best perks about becoming a family nurse is being able to work in flexible and autonomous settings; unlike registered nurses family nurses can be their own boss. Family nurses can work in a wide variety of settings including private offices, nurse-managed healthcare centers, hospitals, long-term care facilities, hospice centers, clinics, schools, homes, and community-based settings. There are various specific roles that FNPs can take including patient and staff educator, case manager, researcher, policy-maker, and administrator.

Typical salaries

Nurse practitioners in general get paid better than registered nurses. On average they make $20,000 more per year than the base salaries of RNs across the country. Because family nurses can manage their own practice, they can increase their income substantially with a bit of entrepreneurial savvy.

Concierge Medicine Doctors – Patients Retention Higher Than Others

According to 2010 poll results conducted among retainer-based and boutique physicians from across the U.S. in May of 2010, findings indicate that 60% of these types of physicians retain their members for roughly 7 to 9 years and longer. These polls have also found that the national retention average for a traditional physician (i.e primary care, family practice, internist, etc.) participating with multiple insurance companies, managed care, etc., retained their people for about 5 to 7 years. I believe this number will only increase as people find out how affordable and relational these types of practices and doctors really are.

It’s unfortunate that somewhere between the late 1950’s and the year 2010, the connection between the doctor and his or her patient was lost. Long gone are the days where our doctor carries a medical bag and visits my house. When medicine became regulated by the government that relationship was quickly eroded and eventually extinguished from our home and our memory. It’s not to say that some form of administration needed to be formulated back then, but now administrative tasks and regulation tasks take up most of the time of our doctors that they must look at a chart or a file to know our name.

In my conversations and surveys with numerous boutique, retainer and direct primary care physicians from across the country, these doctors offices needed to complete eight pages of paper work for one patient to receive a $4 prescription. In this new business model of primary care and family medicine popping up across the U.S., hundreds of doctors have learned that there is a better way.

Why will it grow?

Relationship! Relationship! Relationship! This movement in medicine is based on relationship. When I have a doctor that I know I can call day or night and that he will actually pick up the phone, that’s priceless…and that’s true relationship.

Because this movement is relatively young and data to support the exact number people at any given concierge medical practice for longer than 10-15 years is limited. However, I believe that as we continue to track in the years ahead and follow retention data of these practices that we will learn just how happy so many people are with these types of old-fashioned health care delivery model offices verses a traditional primary care practice. Soon, we’ll find the “happiness” and “healthy” gap between them to be much greater.

Figuratively, this longer-lasting and more personal relationship will result in greater retention data and further solidify concierge medicine’s rightful place in the healthcare market. These types of doctors emphasize that what’s important to people is  true relationship with their doctor and actual dollar-cost savings each month and every year. These are key findings and critical factors in the renewals of membership medicine or direct primary care plans from across the country. I’m very glad to know that there are no a lot of doctors working smarter, not harder and are keeping people coming back year after year. Indeed, there is renewable energy to be found in this form of medicine.

A Family Medicine Career

On average, a family medical physician sees ten to twenty patients per day, and spends approximately fifteen minutes of his or her workday with each patient. A family medical doctor is a primary care physician who treats men and women of all ages. More often than not, he or she treats each individual member of an entire family. Delivering comprehensive health care, the family medical physician is also responsible for prescribing and managing preventive medications for his or her patients.

In the United States, a family practitioner holds either an M.D. or a D.O. degree. He or she must complete a three-year family medicine residency, after medical school, before working as a primary care physician. Family practice can have many attractive qualities that may lead a physician to research the topic further. Family medicine physicians enjoy the luxury of pre-set, standing office hours. As physicians in other fields of medicine will attest, a set daily schedule is a rarity. While the family physician could potentially work long hours, weekends, and holidays, this is very rarely the case for family practice physicians.

Training

A family practice physician is required to complete undergraduate school, followed by medical school, and then a three-year family medicine residency. During residency, a physician will explore the many different aspects of family medicine. A family medical doctor is required, during residency, to rotate through the individual branches of family practice, including but not limited to: geriatrics, gynecology, internal medicine and pediatrics.

A family medical physician treats everyone, no matter his or her race, age, gender, or condition. Usually a specialist has focus in a certain field of practice. The family physician is a database of general, medical knowledge that allows him or her to treat the whole patient, as well as the whole family. Often working as a solo practitioner of his or her practice, a family practice physician may also choose to work as a part of an ensemble of practitioners, all within with the same facility. Most doctors spilt their daily efforts between their private practices and the community hospital.

For all intents and purposes, it has been confirmed by surveys that the family practitioner is most likely to profess that he, or she, is content in both their professional and their personal lives. The family medical doctor often enjoys the freedom of not having to commit to or depend on a community hospital to properly treat their patients. In addition, the schedule flexibility and freedom of time allows the family medical doctor to enjoy his her personal life without having to constantly be on call.

For it’s natural, family-based environment, a family practice is a great way to find balance between work and family. As mentioned previously, the hours can be great and the community involvement priceless. The on-going continued education that comes along with working daily with the people of your community can make for an enriching and fulfilling experience. As of 2007, the average salary of the family medicine career, in the United States, was $160,000 per year.

Family Practice Doctor – Things You Should Consider When Choosing One

Finding a physician for you can be hard enough. However, when you want to go to someone that meets not only your needs, but also your family’s needs, you may have your work cut out for you. That’s because there is so much that you will need this physician to do, such as providing the best help for a sick child, as well as help you get over any adult issues you may be having. There are many things to consider when choosing a family practice doctor. Explore them here.

Credentials

One of the most important things to consider when trying to find the right medical professional for you and your family is their education. The family practice doctor should have completed four years of undergraduate study, medical school as well as a residency program where he or she can get further training. When in school, this medical student will study an array of subjects such as the body’s systems, mental health, physical health and more. Once all their education is complete, he or she may become certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. All this and more is what you want when choosing a physician to care for you and your loved ones.

Demeanor

In addition to credentials, it’s important for the medical professional to have a friendly, easy-going demeanor. It would not be to your advantage to see a physician that is abrasive or always in a hurry, rushing through appointments. You want someone that enjoys working with people and as a family practice doctor, he or she needs to be extra kind, since these physicians see a lot of kids. In addition, you want the physician to be flexible because things can pop up unexpectedly for a lot of people and your physician should work with you.

Office Staff

In addition to considering the doctor, you also want the staff to greet you in a professional manner. If you go to an office and have to deal with a staff that’s rude or inattentive, you’ll need to continue your search for a family practice doctor. Talking with the staff is one of the first impressions you get when you go into a new physician’s office. If for some reason you’re not getting the service you want, don’t settle.

Get a Referral

One of the absolute best ways to feel good about the choice you make when choosing a family practice doctor is by getting a referral from friends, relatives or other physicians. This way you can get an upfront review of the doctor and staff as well as make a more informed decision. With friends and family, you can sit down and go through all the things you want in a physician and they will be able to tell you if the physician they are referring you to has those qualities. Also, physicians know physicians, so it can be perfectly fine to ask a dentist, for instance, if he or she can recommend a good family practice doctor for you.